5 Critical Marketing Decisions for Promoting a Message That Sticks

[GRIT] critical marketingFailing to make a decision about your marketing counts as a decision. It’s passive, but it’s still a choice — and it can cost you.

Oil is crucial to how your car runs. If you use the wrong kind of oil you can create unnecessary transportation issues. To get it right you have to read the manual, talk to the car dealer or your regular mechanic to find the oil that works the best for the engine in your car.

Just like the right kind of oil is critical to how your car runs, there are 5 decisions that impact how effective your marketing will be. If the goal is to create the kind of marketing message that clings to the mind of your target audience, then you have to make some active choices.

1) TAGLINE

Choose a simple phrase to explain your product. Make it easy for people to tell the story of who you are and what you have.

In other words, the goal is to develop a quick and smooth description of your product. You want a sentence with 7 words or less, that highlights the benefit in a language that matters to your audience.

To begin the process of creating or streamlining this bite sized message be sure to check The Artist and The Message — 6 Steps To A Better Tagline. If you put energy into your tagline, you’ll end up with a message that travels well. And the right kind of word of mouth is good for business.

2) STYLE

Pinpoint your personal taste as it relates to your product, and then promote that style throughout your marketing. The style has to be something that resonates with you and your audience.

If your product is for high-end baby boomers at vacation resorts, then you would stay away from child-like fonts,  images of building blocks and/or Seseme Street type branding. Everything about your marketing has to move in the same direction.

Creating a style that appeals to children and grandparents when your audience is that sassy, single 30-something urbanite is like throwing a horror flick in the middle of romantic comedy. Understand your audience and them give them a consistent style that gets and keeps their attention.

3) IMAGE

Decide to have a visual representation for your company.  The goal is to make it easy for people to remember you.

Put money into your logo. Unless you’re a graphic designer or just a natural at layout and design, you will need to get a professional to create it for you. But once you have your quality logo, you can use it everywhere — on your website, business cards, brochures, post cards, etc.

It’s also a good idea to have an appealing headshot. A picture is worth a thousand words plus it adds a human touch and a face to your business.

Like your logo, you can use your headshot on your website, social media, business cards, brochures, post cards. You can also use it in the press releases that you send out to local newspaper, on websites that interview you, and when ever you guest post. Having your headshot ready to go makes your marketing process smoother.

Quick Note: Don’t use some old picture where you cropped your ex-boyfriend out of the shot. Get a quality image so you can put your best face forward.  In Taking It At Face Value — Why Photo Headshots Matter for Entrepreneurs the Managing Editor, Art, highlights several types of shots to avoid.

4) WEBSITE

Decide to create a digital home that can promote you and your products while you sleep, vacation or work on other things. Put your website at the center of your marketing efforts. Instead of making Facebook or Twitter or the latest social media craze your home online, give that position to your professional website or blog.

Don’t make your people stumble upon your website. Tell them where you are online. Give them a place to come back to over and over again. And be sure to promote it on all your marketing materials.

5) SYSTEM

Choose to establish a documented way of getting your message out. This is not about busy work. It’s about the team. When you document your marketing system, you can hire help.

Just start with a checklist. Every time you create a new product you need images of the item, a tagline for the item, a press release about the item, a web page explaining what the item is and what it can do, and so on. You need this information for every product, every single time. That’s the marketing checklist for every new product.

The checklists that you take the time to create today will make it easier for your team to help you. Besides on a really busy day you may be the one to forget a step — let the checklist remember those details and you use your mind for something else.

It’s the attention to details:

  1. a tagline with a clear message,
  2. an appealling style,
  3. a consistent company image,
  4. an informative and engaging website, and
  5. a system that supports your marketing,

that makes the difference in how well you are seen and remembered. Plus, you can make the most of these marketing basics on any budget.

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